Welcome Friends of

Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

We promote conservation and appreciation of natural and cultural resources at Malheur Refuge through education, outreach, advocacy, and on-the-ground stewardship.

Alan Nyiri Marshall Pond Sunset

It's Friendsgiving Season!

Help us Conserve *Restore* Inspire in 2022

We have many plans for the coming year and are inviting you to help support them by contributing to our End of Year Fundraising goal of $20,000! 

187,757 Acres of Wildlife Habitat

The Refuge is famous for its tremendous diversity and spectacular concentrations of wildlife. With more than 340 bird species and 58 mammal species, Malheur Refuge is a mecca for birdwatchers and wildlife enthusiasts.

Planning to visit Malheur National Wildlife Refuge? Allow us to assist you! Learn more about the history and why it was created in the early 1900s.

Our Work
Past and present

Over the past 20 plus years, our team of volunteers and partners have developed a myriad of projects, programs, and events that have helped enhance one of the crown jewels of the National Wildlife Refuge System.

Learn about the Projects, Programs, and Events that we are working on. Join the Friends with volunteer, sponsorship, and giving opportunities.

Latest from Malheur Refuge

Malheur NWR’s Nest Diversity

All birds lay eggs. The nests they build—or in some cases, don’t build—are as diverse as the birds themselves. Here’s a sampling of nests from birds that breed at...

Species Spotlight: White-faced Ibis

Flocks of these long-legged, curved-bill waders are a regular sight in spring, summer, and autumn in the interior West. A drive past Harney County’s many flood-irrigated fields and wet...

Malheur Musings

See our latest monthly newsletter
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I will be visiting soon! Do I need to make a reservation for the bird blind at the Field Station? Also, do I need to ask permission to visit the Burns sewage ponds? If so, does anyone have contact information? Thanks for your help! ... See MoreSee Less

7 hours ago
A tender moment between an American coot and its…adorable young. • The American coot is a somewhat drab water bird with gray and black feathers and a white beak, common in wetlands throughout North America. Coot chicks, however, sport outrageously bright orange and red feathers, skin, and beaks. Researchers have found that coot chicks that hatch later than their nestmates are more brightly colored—which signals to parents that the smaller, brighter chicks need to be fed more to catch up with their siblings. 📸 of coot pair by Peter Pearsall/USFWS #americancoot #highdesert #oregondesert #greatbasin #malheurnationalwildliferefuge #friendsofmalheur

A tender moment between an American coot and its…adorable young. • The American coot is a somewhat drab water bird with gray and black feathers and a white beak, common in wetlands throughout North America. Coot chicks, however, sport outrageously bright orange and red feathers, skin, and beaks. Researchers have found that coot chicks that hatch later than their nestmates are more brightly colored—which signals to parents that the smaller, brighter chicks need to be fed more to catch up with their siblings. 📸 of coot pair by Pet#americancootS#highdeserta#oregondeserts#greatbasind#malheurnationalwildliferefugeo#friendsofmalheur #friendsofmalheur ... See MoreSee Less

19 hours ago

Comment on Facebook

I have never seen a drab any bird.

baby coots are super 'coot.'

Is it possible that a chick may be drowned by its mother because there are too many, the mother may not be able to care for all, and more would die if not for sacrificing that one? Disturbing, yes, but nature sometimes knows more than we.

Not really a water bird. Their feathers absorb water.

The Coot babies are not to miss with their bright color, at Smith and Bybee Wetlands.

The feet of an adult make up for their drabness but you don't get to see them often.

Love these fluffy colorful little babes

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