Welcome Friends of

Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

We promote conservation and appreciation of natural and cultural resources at Malheur Refuge through education, outreach, advocacy, and on-the-ground stewardship.

Alan Nyiri Marshall Pond Sunset

It's Friendsgiving Season!

Help us Conserve *Restore* Inspire in 2022

We have many plans for the coming year and are inviting you to help support them by contributing to our End of Year Fundraising goal of $20,000! 

187,757 Acres of Wildlife Habitat

The Refuge is famous for its tremendous diversity and spectacular concentrations of wildlife. With more than 340 bird species and 58 mammal species, Malheur Refuge is a mecca for birdwatchers and wildlife enthusiasts.

Planning to visit Malheur National Wildlife Refuge? Allow us to assist you! Learn more about the history and why it was created in the early 1900s.

Our Work
Past and present

Over the past 20 plus years, our team of volunteers and partners have developed a myriad of projects, programs, and events that have helped enhance one of the crown jewels of the National Wildlife Refuge System.

Learn about the Projects, Programs, and Events that we are working on. Join the Friends with volunteer, sponsorship, and giving opportunities.

Latest from Malheur Refuge

Species Spotlight: Cinnamon Teal

Written by Peter Pearsall/Photo by Peter Pearsall The Cinnamon teal (Anas cyanoptera) is a small, striking species of dabbling duck found in the Americas, easily recognized by the rich...

Malheur Refuge Carp E-Barrier Project

Written by MNWR Aquatic Biologist Dominic Bachman and Peter Pearsall/Photos by MNWR A new carp removal project at Malheur Refuge will employ an electronic fish barrier (e-barrier), installed near...

Fish Eye View

The native fish species in the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge have been isolated in the springs and waterways there since the Pleistocene era or around 11,000 to 13,000 years...

President’s Note; May

The overarching goal of the refuge, as we all know, is to provide protected habitat for wildlife.  But, as federally managed public lands, the refuge has other goals as...

Malheur Musings

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Wilson’s phalaropes are dainty, eccentric shorebirds that congregate on Malheur’s shallow lakes and ponds by the thousands during migration. Unlike other phalarope species—which nest in the Arctic and spend much of their time wintering on the open ocean—Wilson’s phalaropes breed in North America’s interior and winter in South America. This species regularly nests on the Refuge. Phalaropes typically feed while afloat, frenetically kicking their legs to bring particles to the surface—a technique that incidentally causes the bird to spin like a top. All phalaropes are sexually dimorphic but in an unexpected way: females are larger and more brightly plumaged than males; females compete heatedly for mates; and males do all the nest-building and brooding. 📸: Peter Pearsall #wilsonsphalarope #phalarope #shorebirds #highdesert #oregondesert #greatbasin #malheurnationalwildliferefuge #friendsofmalheur

Wilson’s phalaropes are dainty, eccentric shorebirds that congregate on Malheur’s shallow lakes and ponds by the thousands during migration. Unlike other phalarope species—which nest in the Arctic and spend much of their time wintering on the open ocean—Wilson’s phalaropes breed in North America’s interior and winter in South America. This species regularly nests on the Refuge. Phalaropes typically feed while afloat, frenetically kicking their legs to bring particles to the surface—a technique that incidentally causes the bird to spin like a top. All phalaropes are sexually dimorphic but in an unexpected way: females are larger and more brightly plumaged than males; females compete heatedly for mates; and males do all the nest-building and brooding. 📸: Peter Pearsall #wilsonsphalarope #phalarope #shorebirds #highdesert #oregondesert #greatbasin #malheurnationalwildliferefuge #friendsofmalheur ... See MoreSee Less

6 hours ago

1 CommentComment on Facebook

Sounds like the ideal vacation

The fiesty Rufous Hummingbird is only three inches long and weighs just over three grams—about as much as one and a half pennies. Amazingly, this species makes twice-yearly trips from Central America to as far north as Alaska to breed. The 3,900-mile one-way distance equals 78,470,000 body lengths—by this metric, the longest migration of any bird! 📸: Loree Johnson #rufoushummingbird #highdesert #oregondesert #greatbasin #malheurnationalwildliferefuge #friendsofmalheur

The fiesty Rufous Hummingbird is only three inches long and weighs just over three grams—about as much as one and a half pennies. Amazingly, this species makes twice-yearly trips from Central America to as far north as Alaska to breed. The 3,900-mile one-way distance equals 78,470,000 body lengths—by this metric, the longest migration of any bird! 📸: Loree Johnson #rufoushummingbird #highdesert #oregondesert #greatbasin #malheurnationalwildliferefuge #friendsofmalheur ... See MoreSee Less

3 days ago

7 CommentsComment on Facebook

Feisty, indeed. The Rufous Hummingbirds who visit our gardens always chase away the Broadtails from the nectar bearing plants.

Simply amazing little creatures.

Dang, lookit that li'l eyebrow scowl -"you best not be late providing my nectar!" They're so funny and territorial. We live in a forest, and they'll sit, observing their realm, at the tippy-top of a fir tree and then zoom down to defend their feeders (I have two, for crying out loud) from other hummers who swoop in for a sip. ☺️

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