Peyton Kreuger, 2020 Education Award Recipient!

Congratulations to Peyton Kreuger of Drewsey, OR, for being the 2020 recipient of our education award! In the spirit of promoting the conservation and appreciation of natural spaces and public lands such as Malheur NWR, this $1,000 scholarship is available to any Harney County Resident seeking a degree in Conservation, Wildlife, Environmental Sciences, or Natural Resources related fields.

Peyton applied for the scholarship as a senior at Crane/Union High School at the urging of a counselor. He graduated last month and is planning to attend Eastern Oregon University in the fall to study Natural Resources.

“It means a lot to me and will help me out in obtaining my education at the higher level,” Kreuger said.

“I’ve lived my entire life in Drewsey, OR, with my parents and two younger brothers,” Kreuger said. “I love being outdoors. Hunting is a big part of my life, as well as ranching.”

Kreuger added that these activities are “a big reason why I want to pursue a higher level education in the Natural Resource Field to become a Fish and Wildlife Officer.” We at FOMR wish you the best of luck in your academic pursuits, Peyton!

Introducing FOMR Board Member Liz Jones!

Please welcome Liz Jones, Friends of Malheur Refuge’s newest board member!

Born in Springfield, OR, and raised in Eugene, Liz attended the University of Oregon and has lived in the Pacific Northwest for most of her life.

She first stumbled upon the high desert of Harney County in the early 1980s, while returning from a two-week trip to Yellowstone National Park with her husband Jeff. They stopped at Page Springs Campground, near the southern edge of Malheur Refuge.

Liz knew immediately that they had found a special place. “I went, ‘Wow, I have to come back here,’” she said.

Living in Seattle at the time, she and her husband revisited Harney County on occasion over the years. After they moved back to Oregon in the early 90s to “come home,” as she puts it, she estimates that they’ve been back to visit every year since.

The waters of Harney County are what initially drew her here. “I’m not a passionate birder or a biologist. My passion is flyfishing,” she said. But over the years, she’s come to appreciate the collaborative efforts between stakeholders in the area to conserve natural resources, including those at Malheur Refuge.

Liz learned of FOMR recently, after she and her husband volunteered at the Refuge and the Nature Center & Store. She became a FOMR member soon afterward, and last month she accepted FOMR’s invitation to join the Board of Directors.

“I’m one of those people who join to make a difference,” she said. Liz comes from a corporate business background and brings years of organizational experience to FOMR. We’re very pleased to have her on board!

Responsible Recreation on the Refuge

Written by Peter Pearsall/Photo by Peter Pearsall

With spring well under way and bird migration in full swing, Malheur Refuge would normally be heading into its busiest time of the year. During the COVID-19 health crisis, however, stay-at-home orders and nationwide closures of public spaces have kept most visitors indoors. As restrictions on travel and outdoor recreation are slowly scaled back, more people are keen to get out of their homes and enjoy the springtime scenery and wildlife.

Malheur Refuge has remained open to the public but the majority of its visitor-use facilities, such as the Refuge Visitor Center, Museum, Nature Center & Store and restrooms at Headquarters, were closed out of concern for public safety, says Brett Dean, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Law Enforcement Officer.

Dean is seeing more and more visitors on the Refuge as spring arrives to Harney Basin. He says that while it may seem as though staff are absent from the Refuge (as was the case during the last government shutdown), essential employees are very much hard at work through this crisis, ensuring that Refuge habitats are maintained, wildlife are monitored, and public safety is attended to.

“We’re out there patrolling, making sure folks are following the rules, writing citations if necessary,” Dean says. While there hasn’t been a noticeable increase in recreation violations, Dean says that one perennial issue is Refuge visitors trespassing into areas closed to the public. “We see a lot of people trying to get past those signs to get closer to birds and other wildlife for photos. We understand the urge, but those signs are there to protect wildlife and we ask that visitors respect that.”

Another recent issue was visitors camping on the Refuge, which is strictly prohibited. Dean suspects that since most parks and campgrounds have been closed during the health crisis (including Page Springs Campground, a BLM site just outside of the Refuge), visitors wanting to camp in the area decided to try staying on the Refuge.

Outside of those violations, Dean says that the majority of visitors respect the Refuge and practice responsible recreation: obeying signs and closures, packing out trash, and being respectful to wildlife and other visitors.

“Refuges are great places to experience nature and get away from home, especially in these current times, and we want to support that,” Dean says. “We just ask that visitors follow the rules. And most people do.”

The Difference Between Rabbits and Hares

Written by Peter Pearsall/Photos by Peter Pearsall

The abundance of luxuriant spring growth at Malheur Refuge means plenty of food for resident lagomorphs, the black-tailed jackrabbit (Lepus californicus) and Nuttall’s cottontail (Sylvilagus nuttallii). While both species live year-round at the Refuge, it’s in spring that young are born and sightings of these long-eared mammals become more common.

Rabbits and jackrabbits (also known as hares) belong to the mammalian order Lagomorpha, a classification that sets them apart from other groups of small mammals such as rodents and shrews. Despite the general commonalities between rabbits and hares, there are several distinct differences.

Rabbits tend to prefer semi-wooded areas with plenty of cover; hares frequent wide open spaces. While both rabbits and hares sport long ears and long hind legs, hares tend to be larger, with longer ears and limbs. Hares are also faster, which benefits them in the open habitats that they prefer: hares usually sprint away from predators, while rabbits dart to the nearest hiding place.

Baby rabbits, known as kittens or bunnies, are blind and naked at birth, fully dependent on their mother. Baby hares, called leverets, are born with fur and open eyes, ready to move around within hours of birth.

Hares and rabbits also differ in their dietary preferences. Both rabbits and hares are herbivores but hares tend to feed on woodier material, while rabbits prefer tender leaves and shoots.

This spring and summer, keep an eye out for black-tailed jackrabbits and Nuttall’s cottontails at Malheur Refuge, particularly the young of the year!

Wildflowers of Spring

“Efflorescence”

Sere hills blaze with light:
nothing so beautiful and
numinous as spring

Limpid desert breeze
suffused with heady bouquet
of floral perfume

Here today and gone
tomorrow, a fleeting treat
for all our senses

The first week of May is National Wildflower Week, celebrating native blooms across the country. Enjoy this photo gallery of Great Basin wildflowers taken during previous years by Peter Pearsall!